Home School News Brick BOE Set to Vote on Student Immunization Policy This Week

Brick BOE Set to Vote on Student Immunization Policy This Week

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Brick Township Board of Education/Schools (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick Township Board of Education/Schools (Photo: Daniel Nee)

The Brick Township Board of Education is set to introduce a policy this week on immunization requirements for students that formally adopts New Jersey state laws on immunizations.

Under the proposed policy, new students entering the district’s schools would be required to have a medical examination conducted at a physician’s office or by a school-provided physician. Students would have to comply with immunization policies set forth by the state, which will be “scrupulously observed” in Brick, the policy states, “particularly those dealing with contagious/infectious diseases or conditions.”

The policy – in line with state law – does exempt students from having to receive immunizations in two cases: a religious exemption, or in the case a student has a medical condition such as an allergy that prevents him or her from being able to be vaccinated.

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To qualify for a religious exemption, a parent or guardian would have to submit a written request to school officials. The policy states that district employees “should not question whether the professed religious statement or stated belief is reasonable, acceptable, sincere and/or bona fide.” Additionally, the proposed policy instructs employees to accept and grant the exemption request as long as religion is referenced in the written statement.

To be exempt due to a medical reason, a physician or nurse practitioner would be required to submit a written statement.

Besides the religious and medical exemptions, students must receive vaccinations, either by their own physician or a doctor or nurse hired by the school district.

“Objections to vaccination based on grounds that are not medical or religious in nature and that are of a philosophical, moral, secular or more general nature are unacceptable,” the draft policy states.

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READ THE PROPOSED POLICY: Download/PDF format.
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In New Jersey, school districts are required to grant exemptions to vaccination requirements for religious purposes. According to a recent story which appeared in the Star-Ledger newspaper, about 9,000 children statewide went to school last year – a figure that is five times higher than just a few years earlier, in the 2005-06 school year.

According to the same report, the number of children who are exempted from vaccinations for religious purposes in Ocean County school districts ranks in the middle of state averages. A total of 624 students, or 2.2 percent, are exempt. The county with the fewest exemptions by percentage is Hudson, at 0.7 percent; the county with the highest rate of exemptions is Hunterdon, at 4.8 percent.

The issue of children receiving vaccinations has gained traction nationwide in recent weeks as debate has focused on whether parents should have the right – for religious purposes or otherwise – to opt out of vaccinating their children. The right of a parent to opt out has been weighed against their children’s well-being and the health risk posed by an increasing number of unvaccinated children attending public schools.

The Brick Board of Education’s next meeting, where the policy is set to be introduced, will be held Thursday at 7 p.m. in the Brick Township High School auditorium.


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  • JW P

    Good. We don’t need any dirty hippies trying to ‘keep it natural’ and spread diseases amongst out community.

    • #@#.com

      It’s not “dirty hippies” that are spreading measles and tuberculosis and other communicable diseases around the country. It is mainly the influx of unchecked, unprocessed illegal immigrants that are bringing in these diseases and spreading them. Legal immigrants get tested and screened and quarantined if needed. Illegals come across the boarders without any screening or testing. The government won’t say this just like they won’t say which religious faction is causing most of the terrorism and beheadings and torture around the world.

      • Walter W. Welle

        Do you have any data to back up sich a claim? Regardless of how anyone got here it’s the unvaccinated that bring it in reality and we should be vaxxing everyone.

      • #@#.com

        Yes, 100 % of illegal immigrants are not tested for diseases, and have no criminal background checks, before entering the country.

      • Walter W. Welle

        Yes but you need to cite that resource 🙂

      • Walter W. Welle

        With all due respect I make my comments. Not in hostility but as respectful adults in a dialogue.

      • JW P

        Those illegals coming north are better vaccinated than we are. They still give out smallpox vaccines south of the border, and they don’t have to pay for them either. Good job trying to make everything about ‘mesicans though.

      • #@#.com

        Who mentioned Mexico? Certainly not me, but that was a nice comeback you racist.

      • JW P

        You’re the clown who bought up something totally unrelated to the topic- illegal immigrants. Extremists of all sorts have an incredible ability to make everything about their ownmyopia, which in your case is fundamentally racism. Figures some white supremacist stooge like you would want to throw names around to distract from their own villainy.

    • Walter W. Welle

      Am I missing something, it doesn’t prevent people,from not vaxxing their kids and exposing them to kids who are?

      • JW P

        Yeah, but the whole anti-vaccine fad comes from upper middle class hippy sorts who drone on about ‘toxins’ and natural living nonsense in spite of not being able to identify a single ‘toxin’. Meanwhile they look down their noses at the savages that subject their children to the horrors of modern science :'(((

      • #@#.com

        You must have attended Brick public schools.

  • Walter W. Welle

    There should be more dialogue about this. How can anyone think this policy has teeth? The religious exception allows for no verification or further , for lack of a better word, questioning. Which means anyone in brick can still refuse to immuninize there kids and use the religious exception whether it’s true or not. But that isn’t my point. I totally respect someone religious grounds. But my point is that with kids not being vaccinated, then it still provides threats to healthy children. So if the policy has no teeth, than why have a vote on it at all? I have a friend who doesn’t want to vaccinate his kids because of the “alleged autism link”, he used the religious exception because conscientious objector wasn’t allowed. It can’t be questioned and therefor granted. So what’s the point of having a policy? It really makes me wonder when my son is school age where will I want him to go? Would I let him go to brick schools? Should I home School? I know it sounds extreme but when you read all of the scientifically backed up materially of the value of herd protection when vaxxing it makes you think. I wish more spoke up about this.

    • JW P

      Good point on that one. Immunosuppressed kids usually provide doctor’s notes to the front office for records. Hopefully the administrators make some sense of it and require similar letters from pastors of Christian Scientists affirming that families are members in good standing.