Home Government Odd Bicycle Markings On Route 35 Aren’t A Mistake After All

Odd Bicycle Markings On Route 35 Aren’t A Mistake After All

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'Sharrows' on Route 35 in Bay Head. (Photo: Facebook)
‘Sharrows’ on Route 35 in Bay Head. (Photo: Facebook)

For the past several days, motorists who have traveled on the newly-rebuilt Route 35 in Bay Head have been puzzled over symbols painted on the pavement that seemingly mark a bicycle lane in the middle of the road.

The markings, which show a bicycle and arrows pointing in the correct direction of travel, have been the subject of social media curiosity, with some locals declaring that someone must have made a mistake. Indeed, no mistakes were made, according to the state Department of Transportation.

The markings are known as “sharrows,” the DOT said, and are used as a reminder to motorists and bicycles that each are allowed on the roadway and guide bicycle riders along the portion of the roadway that is statistically safest to avoid car doors.

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In Bay Head, where drivers are allowed to park on both sides of the highway, there wasn’t enough space available to carve out a formal bike lane, so the sharrows were implemented to improve bicycle safety and also act as a reminder to drivers that bicycles may be present.

The DOT said enough sharrows have been added in Bay Head so drivers turning onto the highway from any side street will be reminded of the presence of bicycles.


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  • WhiteyisFedup

    Maybe the bikers should stick to east ave instead of F’n up traffic.

    • Scott

      I think most bikers, including me, do stick to “F’n” east avenue. You might find this hard to believe Whitey but there are many kids that ride bikes to beach and back. Lets worry about the younger bike riders and let the adults try and use their head. Even though you are a bit harsh Whitey, there are a number of adult bike riders’ that are very inconsiderate.

      • SB

        You’re not kidding! It’s the bikers that act like they own the road that piss me off. Some of them ride in the middle of the street, blocking cars from passing them without having to go into oncoming traffic. I have no problem sharing the road with considerate bikers–it’s the arrogant ones that put others in danger that I have an issue with.

      • Mark Story Jenks

        Would you think differently if you were the person on the bike? Personally I don’t ride a bike in traffic lanes. But I can think of at least two reasons why one would. There is always glass and nails on the shoulder. (flats) And motorists pulling out of side streets are less likely to see you. They tend to focus only on the oncoming traffic lane and tend to not see oncoming bikes on the shoulder. Bikes get hit that way often even though they may have the right of way.

      • SB

        I’ve been the person on the bike, but if a car is coming, I get over as far as I can. Many bikers share the road just fine, others not so much. On another note, there are a LOT of jerky drivers on the road who don’t like to share. Jerkiness from either side makes for dangerous travels.

      • JudyAF

        Sharing the road doesn’t mean sharing the lane. the lane is not wide enough to safely pass in. It means share one in front of the other. Cyclist have the same rights to the full safe use of the lane as motorists. Wait till it’s safe with a clear view and change lanes to pass. You might get there a second later.. and the cyclist may get there alive.

      • SoWhat?

        Bikes are not allowed to impede traffic flow by traveling 10 miles and hour in a 50 mile zone. Bikes must keep up with the traffic flow or move as far right as possible and let others pass.

        39:4-14.1 Rights and Duties of Persons on Bicycles.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway is granted all the rights and subject to all of the duties of the motor vehicle driver.

        39:4-14.2, 39:4-10.11 Operating Regulations.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway shall ride as near to the right roadside as practicable exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction. A bicyclist may move left under any of the following conditions: 1) To make a left turn from a left turn lane or pocket; 2) To avoid debris, drains, or other hazardous conditions on the right; 3) To pass a slower moving vehicle; 4) To occupy any available lane when traveling at the same speed as other traffic; 5) To travel no more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded, but otherwise ride in single file. Every person riding a bicycle shall ride in the same direction as vehicular traffic.

        In New Jersey, the law states a bicyclist must obey all state and local automobile driving laws. A parent may be held responsible for the child’s violation of any traffic law.

      • JudyAF

        They have a right to be safe. They don’t ride in the middle of the road.. the ride in the middle of the lane where it is safe. You need to wait till it’s safe and change lanes to pass. They have every right to the full use of the lane for their own safety. You can’t fit a bike and a motor vehicle in any lane that is not wide enough for a standard 5 foot bike lane.

    • JW

      Maybe drivers should be more careful and share the road like they were taught in high school?

  • Mary Scheper VanDeventer

    I saw them doing this and thought no way..bikes in the road with cars?? This is not going to end well!!

    • JW

      Most places don’t have an issue with bikes using roads. That’s where we usually belong.

  • Beach N8iv

    I’ve never been a big fan of riding against the flow of traffic. When I was in school (Granted, a VERY long time ago) we were told to ride FACING traffic so we would know what’s coming and when to get out of the way. True, you have to pay more attention to the cross streets but in the overall scheme of things I believe it’s a LOT safer.

    • JW

      I think you go it mixed up. You walk against traffic and bike with traffic because bikes are vehicles. None of this would be an issue if people didn’t get snippy about sharing sidewalks with cyclists, which is a big issue in proper cities.

      • Beach N8iv

        No, they told us to ride against traffic when I was in elementary school. This was in the late ’50s and early ’60s.

      • Glenn

        I don’t know where you grew up, but I too grew up in the same time period and it was taught walk against, bike w/the flow.

      • SB

        I grew up in North Jersey in the 70’s and we were told the same thing. In fact, they even had some commercials on TV telling us to ride against traffic. I never thought it made much sense…

      • Glenn

        Perhaps they should let motorcycles on sidewalks!

      • JW

        I’m not saying that. But I have known the NYPD to ticket people riding bikes on sidewalks. It’s ridiculous when every other granny has a Rascal with more power than any bike. The absurdity of keeping cyclists off the sidewalk is disproportionate and puts us in danger. Granted this isn’t usually the case in most of the shore communities to my knowledge. Point down to Seaside is very bike friendly. I’ve ridden mine from my house in Herberstville down to Seaside and back in a day without anyone bothering me for riding down Ocean Ave/35 on the sidewalk, which I wouldn’t do if I had to share the roadway with drunken pissed off bennies.

  • Mark Story Jenks

    Extending a little courtesy to share the road requires little to no effort. Most of the roads in our area are very biased against pedestrians and/or bicyclists. There might be more folks walking or riding bicycles if the roads were safer and folks weren’t so lazy, or in such a hurry most of the time. If you are one of those drivers who sits behind your steering wheel and gets angry or annoyed at cyclists you should take a good look in a mirror. Chances are you could stand to shed a few pounds and maybe even improve your attitude if you rode a bike once in a while.

    • SB

      Courtesy goes both ways. When I’m forced into oncoming traffic because I can’t get around a biker taking up the middle of the road, I see that as a problem. And there are lots of bikers who do it on purpose, especially when they’re in groups. Otherwise, I have no problem with it. BTW, your last sentence was childishly unnecessary, yeah?

      • JudyAF

        No one is forcing you onto oncoming traffic. If you haven’t found your brake yet you should retake your drivers test. You slow for slower traffic wait till it’s safe and change lanes to pass.

      • SB

        When there’s a double yellow line and no passing lane? I’m not referring to a place where there are sharrows. I’m referring to a road where there are no passing lanes and possible 2-3 miles of winding road before a car could get around the bikers. I’m really sick of the immature remarks around here. Can’t anyone plead their case using facts and logic without devolving into juvenile remarks? Sheesh.

      • JudyAF

        If there is a double yellow line, that is an indication that it is not safe to pass. It doesn’t matter if there are sharrows or not. A sharrow is just to educate that the lane is too narrow to share side by side. Any lane that can’t fit a bike lane is too narrow to share side by side. A bike needs safe passing space.. and a car and a bike can’t fit side by side in the lane safely. A cyclists controlling the lane is indicating that the lane is too narrow to share. It is extremely rare that any road goes 2 miles without good enough site lines to make a pass. You don’t pass on curves or hills.. you wait till you can pass safely. If you try passing while it is not safe and a vehicle comes in the other direction you will move into the cyclist and kill them. If you have a little patience you will notice that there are only seconds involved till the road may widen out or there is an intersection. The more patience and courtesy you show the safer the cyclist will feel that you are not going to close pass. If there are 5 cars lined up… they will eventually find a safe place to turn out if one doesn’t appear. No motorist has the right to speed. You would slow and wait for a bus, or a tractor or any slower vehicle. The speed limit is a max. Just chill and wait till it’s safe to pass. You don’t blame a bus or tractor for your bad passing decisions. Your convenience doesn’t override the cyclist safety. Would you want to put your family member in danger for the convenience of someone wanting to arrive a few seconds sooner?

      • SB

        Let me be more clear then. This is a road where bikers and cars can and have ridden peaceably, however there are certain groups who like to take up the lanes, riding side by side and don’t give a @#$#@%@# about others who are also trying to use the road. If there’s enough room to share the lane with one biker, then the others can also share it–they choose not to. That is nothing to do with the law–it comes down to acting like an arrogant arse.

      • JudyAF

        You think they have ridden peaceably because you were happy to endanger them by close passing and were just lucky not to have hit them yet. If the lane doesn’t have a bike lane then it is too narrow to share with one bicyclist. Riding to the edge encourages unsafe passes and endangers their lives. I know this because I was hit doing that. So, if the lane is not wide enough to pass one cyclists safely then it doesn’t matter if they ride 2 abreast.. It takes less time to pass a group than a long line when it is safe to pass. Whether they are in the middle of the lane or a single bike on the edge you still need to move out of the lane to pass and only when there are safe sight lines.

    • SoWhat?

      How about when they ride 2,3, or 4 side by side in road? That is Illegal. They also run stop signs and red lights. If you want to ride in the road like a car, then follow ALL the rules of the road. They are also legally required to use hand signals for turning and braking. You are not allowed to impede the flow of traffic, whether you are a car or bike. Hence you can’t ride a bike down the middle of Rt 70 or Rt 195.

      • JudyAF

        The lane is too narrow to share side by side with a motor vehicle safelty so it doesn’t matter how many ride abreast, you need to change lanes too pass. It takes less time to pass abreast cyclists than a long line

      • SoWhat?

        It does matter how many ride abreast.

        39:4-14.1 Rights and Duties of Persons on Bicycles.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway is granted all the rights and subject to all of the duties of the motor vehicle driver.

        39:4-14.2, 39:4-10.11 Operating Regulations.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway shall ride as near to the right roadside as practicable exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction. A bicyclist may move left under any of the following conditions: 1) To make a left turn from a left turn lane or pocket; 2) To avoid debris, drains, or other hazardous conditions on the right; 3) To pass a slower moving vehicle; 4) To occupy any available lane when traveling at the same speed as other traffic; 5) To travel no more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded, but otherwise ride in single file. Every person riding a bicycle shall ride in the same direction as vehicular traffic.

        In New Jersey, the law states a bicyclist must obey all state and local automobile driving laws. A parent may be held responsible for the child’s violation of any traffic law.

      • JudyAF

        PRACTICABLE is the exception to far right. It is not practicable to share any lane that is too narrow to fit both a motorist and bike safely. Any lane that can’t fit a bike lane is too narrow to share. Motorists must change lanes to pass.

  • SoWhat?

    Whenever I see these ridiculously dressed up ass clowns racing their bikes around local streets like they are in the tour de France, I always blow my very loud horn at them. That usually gets at least one of them to jump.

    • JudyAF

      You can be ticketed for in appropriate honking and harassment. Those cyclist carry video cameras The driver of a motor vehicle shall, when reasonably necessary to insure safe operation, give audible warning with his horn but shall not otherwise use such horn when upon a highway.

      Read more: http://www.city-data.com/forum/new-jersey/940433-ticket-honking-horn-insurance-crime-live.html#ixzz3cFlGuOsF

      • SoWhat?

        Car drivers carry cameras also and film the bikers breaking the law. That is why bikers should need to have a license plate to track them down for infractions.

      • JudyAF

        Motorists brake the law more than cyclists.. and when they do, the outcome is deadly. They are driving a weapon. When cyclists break the law, the consequences are generally more to themselves than others. That is why motorists need a lot more insurance. The chances of hurting someone while driving are exponentially higher. Motorists also do more wear and tear to the road. and take up more space on them.. clogging them up

      • SB

        Wonder what the statistics are on accidents or breaking of laws caused by bikers who simply ride away from the aftermath. The person above had a great suggestion. Perhaps they should have to have license plates so they can be tracked down in case of an infringement since they want equality on the road and all.

      • George

        SoWhat? Try to see that there are many different levels of transportation. If you think you’re the only person on the road then you need to change your concept of driving. The bike riders, motorcycle drivers have all the right to the roads. They’re are bad bike riders, motorcyclist and car driver, truck drivers, as well as good riders, drivers and by putting yourself above all this is not going to get you anymore respect or in your heavy handed attitude even less respect. Have you ever tried riding a bike anywhere? Have you tried riding a motorcycle anywhere? If not, then stop the badger and try it before you give your self righteous attitude that you own the road and you need to honk to get attention…come to a bike friendly city and you’ll see how drivers respect each other and the cyclist too. Go visit another country and you’ll see how the culture is favorable to cyclist…expand your horizon and get off your f’cking high horse.

      • SoWhat?

        You ever get laid? Maybe if you didn’t lose your gonads because of riding a bike all the time, you would have a better attitude.

  • SoWhat?

    What do you hate seeing more while driving? Jokers on the racing bikes dressed up like Lance Armstrong wannabes, or the lazy union slugs protesting with the big rat?

    • George

      lame question…

      • SoWhat?

        Lame answer. Grow a pair.

  • SoWhat?

    How about when 20 or so of these stupid looking bicycle riders take up the entire lanes? They are just as stupid and dangerous as the crotch rocket, ninja riding motorcyclists that weave in and out of traffic on the parkway.

    • JudyAF

      Actually they have every right to control the lane safely. You need to slow and change lanes to pass when it is safe. It’s the law. The lane is not wide enough for you to pass in it no matter if there is one or 5 cyclists.
      https://www.facebook.com/BikeWalkCarlsbad/photos/a.674789065909909.1073741829.486146904774127/674789082576574/?type=1&hc_location=ufi

      • SoWhat?

        Wrong again. Bikes need to stay far to the right and let cars pass. No more than 2 bikes side by side.

        39:4-14.1 Rights and Duties of Persons on Bicycles.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway is granted all the rights and subject to all of the duties of the motor vehicle driver.

        39:4-14.2, 39:4-10.11 Operating Regulations.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway shall ride as near to the right roadside as practicable exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction. A bicyclist may move left under any of the following conditions: 1) To make a left turn from a left turn lane or pocket; 2) To avoid debris, drains, or other hazardous conditions on the right; 3) To pass a slower moving vehicle; 4) To occupy any available lane when traveling at the same speed as other traffic; 5) To travel no more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded, but otherwise ride in single file. Every person riding a bicycle shall ride in the same direction as vehicular traffic.

        In New Jersey, the law states a bicyclist must obey all state and local automobile driving laws. A parent may be held responsible for the child’s violation of any traffic law.

      • JudyAF

        Did you see the word Practicable? It is not practicable to ride to the right of a lane that won’t fit both a bike and a motor vehicle. Bikes have the rights of of drivers of motor vehicles.. To use the road.

      • SB

        And what about when there IS no passing lane for a few mile stretch… I find it hard to believe we’re supposed to drive 10mph for miles on end. If there is a passing lane like in this lovely graphic, I agree.

    • George

      when does a bike rider become stupid by riding his bike? And they don’t compare to motorcyclist zipping through traffic jeopardizing their own lives. Once again Judy has been presenting you plenty of information that supports the rights of bike riders in a safe manner that is legitimate to the use of the roads. If they group is riding safely then they are not doing anything wrong. Even if the law says two abreast you can safely pass a group easier than if they are all single file making your pass around the group even longer and more dangerous…have you been reading the postings of Judy? Please be more observant of the words written instead of finding ridiculous blather to say…

  • Kathy Natoli

    I discovered it was not a good idea many years ago to ride a bike on highway 35. It is a highway afterall.
    The signs to Share the Road are new. When I noticed them the other day on my way home, I was perplexed at all the markings on the road and didn’t understand what they meant. I honestly didn’t believe bikes and cars would be riding in the same lane through Bayhead. It didn’t make sense from a safety standpoint. Thank goodness for social media and my use of FACEBOOK! Now I’m informed.
    Therefore, I’d like to enter my thoughts about the sharing of Highway 35 with bicyle riders….I have concerns for everyone’s safety. If you make it through reading my entire post, thanks. I’m sure there will be differing opinions for a variety of reasons. But if while reading my thoughts and you focus on only safety perhaps some better ideas can be posted.
    Now I’m thinking about all the people coming through the area for the first time over the next few days, weeks and summer. I’m guessing they will not understand immediately what those signs mean either. Not everyone reads local area FACEBOOK posts or lives or drives along the barrier island. Perhaps the decision makers would consider placing some kind of ALERT to the approaching drivers BEFORE they reach the area so they are informed and prepared to Share the Road. Just a thought.
    Although related, and I absolutely agree, we could use a lot more mutual courtesy on the roadways. But to keep to the point of safety; I’d like to keep those opinions aside to avoid getting off track of my concern. Courtesy when not extended, in all things, is an entire subject on it’s own.
    I’ve noticed that the posted speed limit on Highway 35 South and North throughout that section of Bayhead is 30-35 MPH. Vehicular traffic in most instances will go the posted speed limit and more when possible. I think many could agree on that.
    I also noticed that once the roadway enters into Mantoloking, lines direct bike riders into their own lane. (That’s a good thing). Although as of this writing the lanes were not marked.
    So I’m wondering what the effect may be when a biker (of any age) rides their bike into the flow of existing traffic? If necessary, will drivers be able to brake quickly enough to allow them into the flow of the already moving traffic? What about the driver behind that car? Can a chain reaction be avoided for those following too close that can’t see a bike entering the highway? Small cars following an SUV or a truck often times can’t see what’s up front.
    OKAY, OKAY…we all know the rules that drivers are responsible for maintaining a safe distance and to pay attention at all times, drive safely and obey signs etc. The reality is…too many don’t. Even with all the awareness, we still have texting and cell phone use while driving going on, tailgating, speeders, and impatient drivers coming off of heavy parkway traffic just anxious to finally get to their destination – oh NO here comes road rage.
    Just some silly thoughts now: Imagine a biker possibly nervous or frantically trying to keep up or seeking a way out after realizing they should have waited before entering the highway. Should the biker pedal faster, will they be able to pedal faster, does it even matter? Cars parked on both sides of the roads limit the bikers ability to go elsewhere. Will drivers that park on Highway 35 in the Bayhead area look BEFORE opening their doors to exit their vehicle?
    Regardless of how many signs are posted, some people do as they do.
    A personal experience: In previous years both my husband and I crashed or almost crased into a car door being opened as we approached. Once was serious and could have beeen fatal. He was thrown into Highway 35 S and battered but lucky there were no cars coming. His bike was destroyed and never replaced. We felt bad for the driver as he was shook up. It was an accident, he didn’t look and he was sooo sorry. More than once I went head over heals with quite a few bruises avoiding a car door being opened. Needless to say, we don’t ride bikes anywhere along Highway 35 anymore. I shudder to think of the outcome of some unfortunate bike rider slamming into an opening car door with the continuous flow of traffic.
    It’s my opinion that there are safer places to ride bikes or get to a beach access point by bike without jeopardizing anyones safety or infringing upon their right to use the roads.
    I live here and know that over the years many bikers, walkers and vacationers routinely use the two side roads parallel to Highway 35 N & S. Why? Well, for me, it’s definitely safer. Those side roads are neighborhoods, not high traffic highways. Those side roads are one- way streets so you know which way the traffic is going. (Most) vehicles that use those streets are driven by people living on those blocks or drivers that are aware that they are side streets with a lower speed limit. Therefore, (most) are aware the streets are used by children riding their bikes or playing in the streets, crossing to the beaches or families taking their daily walks, Thus they are somewhat more courteous. I say that with a grin thinking some of you reading this lengthy post may disagree. Ah but then, we get into the courtesy issue.
    Last note with respect to the person riding their bike to get to the beaches in Bayhead. If a biker needs to cross Highway 35 to get to the beach, why not ride with more safety along the side street and use the crosswalks that provide them safe access.
    Lastly, recognizing everyone’s right to use the roads, why take a chance of jeopardizing anyones safety if that is avoidable?
    Have a safe and happy summer!

    • JudyAF

      Too bad they did a bad placement. The sharrows are supposed to be in the Center of the effective lane not off the right. Cyclists need to ride right down the center. Motorists need to change lanes to pass. The lane is too narrow to share side by side with a motor vehicle safely. https://www.facebook.com/BikeWalkCarlsbad/photos/a.674789065909909.1073741829.486146904774127/674789082576574/?type=1&hc_location=ufi

    • George

      Kathy N, your perspective is good and gives other readers a perspective that some drivers need to ease up a bit, give other drivers ahead of them a little more room to see the road ahead (because tailgating gives you less perspective and less time to react to situations) The adding of sharrows will give the bike rider the “right” to use the whole lane and eliminate the possibility of being hit by an opening door from parked vehicles. And being the middle of the lane allows you to be seen by the drivers on the side roads as they look your way to see if they can enter the road. If there is a second lane traveling in the same direction the sharrows will remind the drivers that they will need to be more attentive to possible cyclist in that lane a be prepared to change lanes to pass riders. once the drivers start to comprehend this the flow of traffic will go smoothly. If Rte 35 is just a 2 lane road then the drivers will need to be more patient and understand the flow of traffic and give themselves more time when driving this route. From the limited maps I’ve seen of this route it’s better for the traffic to slow down and enjoy the scenery anyway…my 2 cents. I hope you’ll get back on the bike and enjoy our surroundings. GG

  • Ortley guy

    Let’s face it. Encouraging bicyclists to ride on Rate 35, a state HIGHWAY is just stupid. We told NJ DOT this was a bad idea, but they insisted the state wants a bike lane from Island Beach Park to Bayhead. When we suggested to Ocean County that they paint a bike lane on Bay Blvd in Ortley and Lavallette instead, they said they would not because it was unafe and would create too much liability. How can government agencies be such total idiots? And the NJ DOT is the worst of them.

    • JudyAF

      Cylists have the right to use any road that will get them to their destination whether or not it has a sharrow painted in it. The sharrow is just to educate to the law. When a lane is too narrow to fit a bike lane, it is too narrow to share side by side with a motorist. A cyclists has the right to use the full lane and motorists need to change lanes to pass safely. https://www.facebook.com/BikeWalkCarlsbad/photos/a.674789065909909.1073741829.486146904774127/674789082576574/?type=1&hc_location=ufi

      • SoWhat?

        You are wrong.

        39:4-14.1 Rights and Duties of Persons on Bicycles.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway is granted all the rights and subject to all of the duties of the motor vehicle driver.

        39:4-14.2, 39:4-10.11 Operating Regulations.
        Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway shall ride as near to the right roadside as practicable exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction. A bicyclist may move left under any of the following conditions: 1) To make a left turn from a left turn lane or pocket; 2) To avoid debris, drains, or other hazardous conditions on the right; 3) To pass a slower moving vehicle; 4) To occupy any available lane when traveling at the same speed as other traffic; 5) To travel no more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded, but otherwise ride in single file. Every person riding a bicycle shall ride in the same direction as vehicular traffic.

        In New Jersey, the law states a bicyclist must obey all state and local automobile driving laws. A parent may be held responsible for the child’s violation of any traffic law.

      • JudyAF

        Sharrows mean bike may use full lane. It is not practicable to ride to the right of any lane that is too narrow to share with a motor vehicle.

  • Mike Ryan

    Bottom line is that legally, bikes are considered vehicles. A bike going against traffic is technically breaking the law. And if hit, even if the driver would seem at fault, would be the one in the wrong. I saw it happen in Pt. Beach where a bike going south on 35 north was hit by a turning car, and the bicyclist got the ticket.

  • JudyAF

    Too bad they did a bad placement. The sharrows are supposed to be in the Center of the effective lane not off the right. Cyclists need to ride right down the center. Motorists need to change lanes to pass. The lane is too narrow to share safely. https://www.facebook.com/BikeWalkCarlsbad/photos/a.674789065909909.1073741829.486146904774127/674789082576574/?type=1&hc_location=ufi

    • SoWhat?

      Bikes need to move to right.

      39:4-14.1 Rights and Duties of Persons on Bicycles.
      Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway is granted all the rights and subject to all of the duties of the motor vehicle driver.

      39:4-14.2, 39:4-10.11 Operating Regulations.
      Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway shall ride as near to the right roadside as practicable exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction. A bicyclist may move left under any of the following conditions: 1) To make a left turn from a left turn lane or pocket; 2) To avoid debris, drains, or other hazardous conditions on the right; 3) To pass a slower moving vehicle; 4) To occupy any available lane when traveling at the same speed as other traffic; 5) To travel no more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded, but otherwise ride in single file. Every person riding a bicycle shall ride in the same direction as vehicular traffic.

      In New Jersey, the law states a bicyclist must obey all state and local automobile driving laws. A parent may be held responsible for the child’s violation of any traffic law.

      • JudyAF

        As far right as is practicable. It is not practicable to ride to the right of any lane that is too narrow to share with a motor vehicle. Safe passing means change lanes. You can’t pass safely in the same lane.

  • JudyAF
  • SoWhat?

    39:4-14.1 Rights and Duties of Persons on Bicycles.
    Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway is granted all the rights and subject to all of the duties of the motor vehicle driver.

    39:4-14.2, 39:4-10.11 Operating Regulations.
    Every person riding a bicycle on a roadway shall ride as near to the right roadside as practicable exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction. A bicyclist may move left under any of the following conditions: 1) To make a left turn from a left turn lane or pocket; 2) To avoid debris, drains, or other hazardous conditions on the right; 3) To pass a slower moving vehicle; 4) To occupy any available lane when traveling at the same speed as other traffic; 5) To travel no more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded, but otherwise ride in single file. Every person riding a bicycle shall ride in the same direction as vehicular traffic.

    In New Jersey, the law states a bicyclist must obey all state and local automobile driving laws. A parent may be held responsible for the child’s violation of any traffic law.

  • SoWhat?

    Men who take up cycling could be harming their health if they don‘t choose the right bicycle. They should be wary of problems ranging from genital numbness, erection problems and soreness to skin irritation in the groin area.

    Men who cycle frequently can also experience changes to their sperm function because of the excessive heat generated in the pelvic area. Male infertility is recognized as a possible side effect of cycling. Regular cyclists also run a higher risk of testicular damage and impaired testicular function.

    Mountain bikers run a particular risk. Studies have shown that they exhibit higher levels of scrotal abnormalities than on-road cyclists.

    What should men look for in a bicycle? The proper fit, including the correct level of pedal resistance and saddle height. A properly padded saddle, along with bike shorts, can also help to reduce sexual problems among male cyclists

  • SoWhat?

    The only thing worse than dressing up like a clown and riding a racing bike around crowded traffic , is getting on the internet to defend this lame sport.

  • George

    Hey SoWhat, seems you have a little problem staying focused on the subject matter. That’s ok, ignorance is your blissfulness. But that doesn’t mean you can rule the road. The state laws have been written understand them and you won’t be taken to jail for vehicular manslaughter in the future. That will keep you from learning a new way of getting laid. Take care