Home Government Brick Council Introduces Regulations on Deliveries, Storage of Firewood

Brick Council Introduces Regulations on Deliveries, Storage of Firewood

28
Firewood (Credit: Christine Kongsvik/Flickr)
Firewood (Credit: Christine Kongsvik/Flickr)

Responding to complaints from numerous residents, the Brick Township Council on Tuesday night introduced a new ordinance introducing several regulations on the storage and delivery of firewood in the township.

“There have been reports of wood being cut around the clock and the noise has been unbearable for some people,” said Council President Paul Mummolo.

The ordinance introduced Tuesday night limits deliveries of firewood to two in 30 days, prohibits storage in front yard after 10 days from the initial delivery date, and requires that firewood must be stored at least three feet from lot lines between homes. Under the ordinance, a homeowner would be limited to either a single delivery of log-length material each month, or two deliveries of split-length wood each month.

ADVERTISEMENT - STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Firewood stored on the side or rear lot of a home “shall be effectively screened from view” from the front yard or the street, the ordinance states. Firewood stored outdoors must be stored in “neat, secure stacks,” the ordinance states, and should not be stacked more than four feet tall except if positioned against a fence – in which case it can be stacked as high as the fence.

No residence may have more than two cords of wood stored at any time, and no more than one-fourth of a fireplace of cord can be stored on a porch, according to the ordinance. Storage on a front porch must be in a metal storage device.

Additionally, the ordinance states that “brush, debris and refuse” from the processing of firewood must be disposed of within 10 days.

Finally, firewood present on a residential property must be for personal use only – not for resale.

The ordinance provides fines for violations under the township’s general penalty – a fine not exceeding $2,000, 90 days or less in the county jail, or 90 days of community service. The general penalty, in practice, is often applied to a significant less harsh extent than provided for in the township code. According to the code, owners would have at least 30 days to abate any violations.

The ordinance will be up for a public hearing prior to final adoption, which will occur at the Oct. 6 council meeting.

~

Correction: This story, in its original version, attributed the following quote to Mayor John Ducey. It was, in fact, Council President Paul Mummolo’s quote:

“There have been reports of wood being cut around the clock and the noise has been unbearable for some people,” said Council President Paul Mummolo.