Home Government Brick Takes One of the County’s Largest Recycling Revenue Shares

Brick Takes One of the County’s Largest Recycling Revenue Shares

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An automated recycling can from Brick Township, N.J. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
An automated recycling can from Brick Township, N.J. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

Though prices have declined in recent years thanks to a combination of the global economy and manufacturing practices, recycled materials continue to pay dividends to local communities, including Brick.

The township recently received a check for $12,068, the third highest in Ocean County, as part of the county government’s recycling revenue sharing program. The program, launched in 1995, provides a portion of the revenue taken in by the county for recycled goods back to the municipalities. Though each local community picks up its own recycling collections, the items are ultimately brought to the county recycling center, officials said. The program has returned more than $15 million to towns since its inception.

Over the past 21 years, however, prices on recycled goods have fluctuated, and are down significantly from previous highs. For instance, tin cans are down $34 per ton, to $98 per ton, aluminum has seen a decline of $163 per ton and some plastics have decreased by as much as $140 per ton in comparison to the same period in 2015 when the payout per ton was $6.56.

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During the first half of 2016, Ocean County collected 37,883 tons of recyclables from its municipalities. The payout for the period was $2.57 per ton.

“These prices change all the time,” Freeholder Gerry Little said. “And even though we have seen a decline in the average price of many of the commodities we recycle, we are still able to return money to our towns.”

The biggest savings for towns comes in the form of avoiding “tipping fees” at the county landfill. The 37,883 tons of items recycled generated money for towns, rather than costing money for disposal.

Brick was the third-highest recipient of recycling revenue. Lakewood received $18,214 and Toms River received $17,206.


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  • KaayC

    How much is it costing us to administrate this program for twelve thousand dollars? I think as a society we need to reduce some of the ridiculous packaging that creates so much of this trash.

    • J W

      Do you know how much it costs to tip a garbage truck? Making pennies on a ton of trash is better than paying $800 to put it in a hole in Manchester Twp.

      • KaayC

        No, but I am confident in your omniscience.

      • J W

        Call the Ocean County Landfill in Machester and ask. It’s very high. An old friend of mine used to work for them at the on site power plant.

      • KaayC

        Again, I think it speaks to the point that we all need to buy less stuff. Quality, not Quantity. : )

  • Mac

    Ah yes, the annual Election Day propaganda campaign display of no real substance. It’s like getting a dime back a year per person for throwing out all the trashy, but flashy, Ocean County Freeholder campaign flyers that arrive almost daily for a month or so before one goes to the polls. This is Ocean County Republican politics folks, and this is as good as it ever gets.

    • Mac

      I’m one of the people that personally benefit the most from this propaganda campaign. Due to my renowned outstanding handicapping of the value of our lifetime elected current county bozos, they have personally honored me by going to all the trouble on their own to remove my name from their suckers’ mailing list, thus eliminating my need to deposit my pound of glossy campaign flyers into the recycling trash in order to earn my dime.

      • Goodgrief

        Would you mind saying which town you live in? The more you write the more I think I should have read about you over the years.

      • Mac

        Laughing, but thanks for the attention. I gave your request a lot of consideration, even going so far as the ask my neighbors this evening what they thought of the idea. They responded with an extremely loud ‘No way!’ However, in all fairness to them, the 12′ tall bobbled-wire fence that surrounds my property containing 150 or so patrolling attack dogs we can see regularly from behind our bullet-proof windows may have swayed their objectivity a bit. 🙂

  • Flash

    All you posters have hit it on the head.Here comes the B.S.