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Cops: Dealer Drove to Ocean County on Thanksgiving With 52 Pounds of Pot

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David Lincoln (Photo: Ocean County Jail)
David Lincoln (Photo: Ocean County Jail)

County detectives nabbed an Idaho man on Thanksgiving Day who was bringing 52 pounds of marijuana into Ocean County to sell, officials said Friday.

David L. Lincoln, 65, of Ketchum, Idaho, was identified in an investigation as being a suspect in the importation of large amounts of marijuana into the county, said Capt. Jack Sramaty of the prosecutor’s office’s Special Operations Group. 

During the course of the investigation detectives learned that Lincoln allegedly travels across the country to locations on the east coast, including Ocean County, delivering large amounts of marijuana. Detectives learned that Lincoln used a red, 1997 Jeep Cherokee and a small towable pop-up camper to store and deliver the quantities of pot to his customers.

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On Thanksgiving morning, detectives from the Special Operations Group, members of the Jackson Township Police Department and the Ocean County Sheriff’s Department K-9 Unit located the Jeep and towable camper traveling in the area of Houston Avenue in Jackson Township. Officers conducted a motor vehicle stop on the Jeep Cherokee and camper and arrested Lincoln.

Detectives obtained search warrants for the Jeep and camper, and seized approximately 52 pounds of marijuana along with approximately $118,000 dollars in cash, Sramaty said. Detectives with the Prosecutor’s Financial Crimes Unit located bank accounts utilized by Lincoln to facilitate the illegal activity, and seized them as well, he said.

The seized marijuana has an approximate street value of $150,000 dollars. Police also seized the Jeep and the pop-up camper pending forfeiture proceedings.

Superior Court Judge Rochelle Gizinski set bail on Lincoln at $575,000 cash. Lincoln was subsequently processed and housed in the Ocean County Jail in lieu of bail. Detectives with the prosecutor’s Special Operations Group are continuing their investigation through the holiday weekend.

“The dedication and commitment of the detectives of both the Special Operations Group and the Financial Crimes Unit are second to none,” Sramaty said in a statement. “As a team, the Prosecutor’s Office will continue to follow Prosecutor Coronato’s mandates by relentlessly identifying, investigating and prosecuting the dealers who are operating in and around Ocean County.”


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  • east coast resident

    Pot is legal at other states. What’s wrong with Jersey?

    • J W

      We have a very regressive governor whose only talent seems to be fetching fast food for a guy who just stuck a knife in his back.

      • east coast resident

        you’re right. He vetoed legislation to require gun makers to produce ‘smart guns”, so they wouldn’t fire, if its not the owner, because he works for the gun lobby, but doesn’t allow pot, which doesn’t kill anyone

      • RChadwick

        While I’m not fond of the Governor, he made the right move in that case. Problem is, There are no reliable smart guns. The technology doesn’t exist, and likely wont for 50 years, if ever. ANY failure, either in allowing a gun to fire when it shouldn’t, or preventing a gun to fire when it should, could be catastrophic. If reliable technology existed, why not give it to our police?

      • east coast resident

        Your argument is partially factual. If we require that aspirin bottles are child proof, then we should require the same of guns. Not all aspirin bottles are foolproof, but, that should not stop us from making them hard to open. I would argue that the same effort should be expanded on guns, which are much deadlier and much less useful than an aspirin

      • RChadwick

        A medicine lid is a very simple device, akin to a trigger lock that is already mandated by law. However, imagine that you needed heart medicine quickly, or you could die. While you are struggling to open the top, a “smart lid” says “Press your fingerprint on the top of the lid”. Anyone’s who been to Great Adventure in the past two years knows how this will play out. After trying 5 times to get the “smart” lid to recognize you, it might require some kind of override, or simply go into lockdown mode. While a “Smart Lid’ is absolutely a great way to completely eliminate prescription drug abuse, it might leave you dead. One might argue it’s a small price to pay to completely eliminate drug abuse. COMPLETELY ELIMINATE DRUG ABUSE. The same way smart guns would completely eliminate gun deaths.

        Again, if making a gun harder to use is a good thing, we should start with all of our police.

        If you are a single Mom of 3 adorable children, and 4 large men just broke down your front door, I imagine you would think a gun is much more useful than an aspirin.

      • east coast resident

        Your last sentence is where it proves that the NRA’s and the gun lobby’s propaganda has affected you. Keep in mind that I am against the 2nd amendment, or the interpratation of it by the Supreme court. the militia (police or army) should have access to weapons, after vetting and strict training. Not every Tom, Joe or Harry that can go to most of the Southern states and buy a gun easier than he can buy a can of soda and use it to take lives. A gun in the home is rarely ever used for home defense. As a matter of fact, 99.5% of the time, it is used to kill a family member, commit suicide, or accidentally kill someone. Or it could be stolen and used in a robbery, or home invasion. Unless you are trained and have nerves of steel, you will not be able to hit an intruder to your home. And, most likely, the gun would be locked somewhere, because of the fear that your kids might have access to it. And, most likely, the intruders have a gun already, that was purchased legally and by them, or stolen. That’s why there should be “gun recognition” technology, if guns will not be banned outright. They don’t belong in a civilized society.

      • Mac

        I interrupt the 2nd Amendment as our right to protect ourselves from our government while helping to ensure the protection and well-being of the community. Good and bad, guns are a big part of our nation’s history, and are unlikely to be banned in America in our lifetimes. While many of your observations above have merit, each one of us is our own last line of self-defense. Not everyone is a nice person. As for the 99.5% stat, how many actual deaths sadly occurred by family members as opposed to the number of guns safely kept in all gun owners homes?

      • east coast resident

        European countries have totally banned the sale of guns. Same as Canada and Australia. People there are as free and more so than us, here. The government does not oppress them. Why should our government be any different. Your reasoning is also another manifestation of how well the propaganda of the NRA and the gun manufacturers has done its work

      • Mac

        1. Q: Why should our government be any different.
        A. It’s a people thing.
        2. As for my reasoning, huh, I didn’t know that, who would have
        thought. My 8th grade civics teacher would be so disappointed.

      • Rosie O’Donnell has autism

        If ignorance is bliss, you must be ecstatic.
        Europe, Australia and Canada have not totally banned the sale of guns.
        The people there are not more free than us.
        Th

      • east coast resident

        That’s your take on it. And of course, its not based on facts. But, I wouldn’t expect you to fact checked anything you’re writing. And if you do, its from news sites that only spew propaganda. Not real news.

      • east coast resident

        The 99.5% statistic is proof that guns are rarely ever used against a home invader. Sure, there are many guns kept safely. But, not everyone is responsible.

      • Mac

        Many people don’t drive well for all kinds of reasons, but they still get driver’s licenses. There are always going to be irresponsible people involved in any situation, in this example both the driver and the DMV. Even though I live in a bedroom community that is considered a place where crimes don’t happen, i know that in communities similar to mine that they do happen, so the gun stays just in case my home becomes part of the 0.05% and I have at least an opportunity to defend myself and my family.

      • east coast resident

        That sounds good, that you will be able to defend your self, but, if you have the gun locked up as any responsible gun owner should do, you might have to ask the home invader to wait until you unlock the cabinet and then confront him. If you have access to it at all times, then, it might go off accidentally, or be stolen, or used by someone like a child. The fantasy of many gun owners of confronting a bad guy is not that easy to implement. I’m sure you agree with that

      • Mac

        What I’m sure about is that I’m very comfortable with my security and my ability to employ it, while also being aware that no security is foolproof. I’m come to the opinion our biggest difference is that I view the glass half full as opposed to half empty.

      • Rosie O’Donnell has autism

        You’re talking out your azz!
        The USA is a big country.
        Lets see you live in Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, or any other state out in the wilderness with mountain lions wolves and grizzlies and rattle snakes and murderers and thieves. Sometimes the nearest police staion is an hour or many more away.
        Believe it or not many millions of Americans protect themselves and their families and farms and ranches with guns and dogs.
        Millions of people feed their families by hunting.
        Not everyone lives in their moms basement like you and gets their food from their mommies refrigerator.
        City people depend on police . Millions of rural and wilderness people cannot.

      • east coast resident

        I really believe that you’re the one with autism. Not Rosie. BTW, I dont live in my Mom’s basement.

      • RChadwick

        I knew you’d get there eventually. It’s sad that people like you know full well that smart guns, as well as assault weapons bans, banning hollow point bullets, throwing gun owners in jail for a decade for paperwork violations, and any number of unreasonable restrictions and punishments will do absolutely nothing to stop gun violence, or even save lives. You simply hate guns so much, that any restriction is fine, and no restriction is too much. You probably wouldn’t be opposed to life in prison for gun possession. You might not even care if you knew an anti-gun law would kill people. Perhaps you would be more comfortable living in any number of dictatorships that have such laws. Our founding fathers were wise beyond common understanding. They knew there would be people like you that would never get it, so they made it the SECOND amendment, right after freedom of speech. They knew that arms were power, and that power should always stay in the hands of the people. That is the difference between us and all those other polite countries you mentioned that banned guns. We are free because we have the power to be free, and to take back our freedom if it is ever required. Those other countries are free because their political leaders ALLOW them to think they are free. That might last another 5 years, or another 50. American attitudes are different. WE are ultimately in charge. WE elect our leaders. WE THE PEOPLE have the power. It is subtle, but it is a huge difference that sadly many people are not capable of understanding.

        I respect your right to hate firearms. Frankly, I expected as much. I’m thankful that organizations like the NRA help to defend our right to own guns.

        Before you call me a radical right wing nut, I completely support legalizing weed. I completely support gay rights. I think for myself. I don’t let any group fill in my opinions for me. I hope you can say the same.

      • east coast resident

        Its good to hear that you think for yourself. But, I know from your writings, that you are blinded to the fact that there are more than 30,000 gun deaths as year in this “freedom loving” country. You most likely have never visited Europe, or Australia, or even Canada, to see how it feels to really be free. The added freedom there, is also the fact that guns are not involved in every day life, as they are here. You don’t see kids getting shot while sleeping, because of a gun fight out on the street. Robberies don’t turn deadly, as when guns are involved. Crime is universally lower and that’s not because they are able to defend themselves with guns. Its because they dont have access to guns. When our founding fathers wrote the constitution, there was danger from wild animals, native Americans and the ever-present danger of a slave revolt. They had no idea that there would be semiautomatics that would kill 50 people at a time, as happened in Orlando. They couldn’t look into the future. According to the constitution, you can have a musket, as long as you’re part of a militia (police or the army) As for America being able to elect its leaders, we saw how that happened with Trump losing the popular vote and yet, becoming president. You, along with all the other backers of the NRA, will have plenty to answer to your maker.

      • RChadwick

        I think you have your statistics off. Even anti-gun websites report the number to be around 13,000, not 30,000. When you look closer, it turns out most of those are police shootings or gang related. By your logic, all we would have to do is take the guns away from the police, and ban guns from the general population as well. Once all guns magically disappear (Because laws have that ability somehow), the gangs will simply yell at each other. Your fallacy is that guns create crime and murder. Problem is, if you remove all gun murders in this country, our murder rate is still higher than many of the countries you mentioned. We don’t have a gun problem. We have a crime and violence problem. If we address the root cause of our problems, perhaps we can save some loves. If you treat your cancer pain with aspirin instead of chemotherapy, you might not like the results.

        The bottom line… Guns are so intertwined with being American, that if we ban guns, we will literally cease to be American.

      • east coast resident

        As a matter of fact, the number of gun killings is 32,000. Plus more than 80,000 injuries, that cost the tax payers billions of dollars. That includes murders, suicide and accidental deaths. Sure, people who want to commit suicide can still jump off a bridge. But, guns make it easier. And, of course, bridges have many other uses, other than for people to jump off. Guns have no other use, than hurt and kill. As for guns being a part of the American fabric, slavery was also part of our fabric. It was done away with. Guns were part of the Australian fabric also. They did away with them and are much better for it

      • Rosie O’Donnell has autism

        Mandatory 10 years hard labor in a prison camp in Arizona desert for any crime with a gun.
        Punish the criminals, not law abiding Americans.

      • Mac

        I believe the Arizona Chris Christie sheriff you seem to be referring to is under federal indictments at the moment, unlike his name sake in NJ still successfully staring down the 120 clowns in our Assembly and Senate who can’t muster the courage to do so.

      • Rosie O’Donnell has autism

        Your ignorance kills me!

      • east coast resident

        You must be so smart, to be able to tell that I’m ignorant, by my post. Or, you are another one of those braves that call others names, while hiding behind their computer.

  • Mac

    Sorry Dave, but most outsiders don’t realize that when you try to make someone happy in NJ, someone else will delight themselves with shoving a shiv into your back, then brag about it.

  • MP Gerrity

    Readers of this article who support the legalization of cannibis for medical purposes would be wise to encourage there Federal Congressional legislators to pass the CARERS Act. It is our best shot at decriminalizing cannibis and allowing access for veterans who suffer from PTSD. The attached link will open an article explaining the federal laws and the details of the CARERS Act. Congress must act on this bill by the end of this year. Exercise your rights and demand action

    http://www.safeaccessnow.org/federal_marijuana_law

  • Rosie O’Donnell has autism

    Lets make the entire planet child proof!
    Kumbaya.
    I’d to teach the world to live, in perfect harmony.
    Imagine only unicorns and rainbows.
    Ban all weapons and chemicals and disease and haters and inequality and races and religions.

    • Mac

      Since they say that Earth is millions, even billions, of years old, don’t you think civilization has had that opportunity many times in the past with no success?