Home Brick Life Take a Look Inside the New ‘Boulevard at Brick’ Apartments

Take a Look Inside the New ‘Boulevard at Brick’ Apartments

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Boulevard at Brick (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: Daniel Nee)

Boulevard at Brick, the new four-building apartment complex off Brick Boulevard, is already changing perceptions.

Its staff, while leading Shorebeat on a tour of the 120-unit community, said the development is the first of its kind in town – a luxury apartment complex with state-of-the-art technology, professional managers and landscapers on-site and a luxurious pool, gym, clubhouse and business center on the way.

“We’re getting a good response because there’s nothing else like this in Brick,” said Erin Young, property manager for TFE Properties, Boulevard at Brick’s developer and management company. “I did a market study when we were first going to do this product, and it was hard to get comparables. We tried to offer a good product and still be comparable, square footage, to what’s out there.”

Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: Daniel Nee)
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The development offers one bedroom and two bedroom units – 914 square feet for the single bedroom and a range of 1,202 to 1,399 square feet for the two-bedrooms – complete with keyless entree, security systems that can be controlled from a smartphone, elevators and state-of-the-art appliances in each unit. In addition to the “espresso” colored cabinetry are stainless steel Samsung refrigerators and gas stoves, plus Quartz countertops and plank flooring.

Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)

“Every unit has its own private patio or balcony,” said Young, adding that most units include ample storage and many feature walk-in closets. Each unit, regardless of size, comes with a full-size washing machine and dryer.

“Our hottest commodity is the one bedroom,” said Julia Coppock, marketing director for TFE. “We’re completely sold out in the first building and the second building, and we’re already into the third building.”

Tenants began moving in Nov. 1 to the first two buildings. The third and fourth buildings are nearly complete and will be ready for move-ins shortly after the new year, Copp0ck said.

Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)

Rent for the one-bedroom unit is $1,495 per month, plus utilities. There are three two-bedroom units that cost $1,825, $1,895 or $2,150 per month, plus utilities, depending on their location and layout. There is a $150 per year amenities fee and a $250 deposit per pet.

Young said the community has attracted a mix of tenants, though many are living away from home for the first time. Others are newly-married couples moving to their first home together. Still others are empty-nesters downsizing after their children have gone away to college.

“We have a good mix of people, young to old,” said Young, who predicts the community will become even more social once several amenities are completed. They include a 3,000 square foot pool, a fitness center with three treadmills, two elyptical machines and free weights, plus a 4,000 square foot clubhouse that will include a business center.

Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)
Boulevard at Brick (Photo: File)

In a community like Brick where multi-family housing complexes often draw scrutiny, representatives from the company say Boulevard at Brick will remain in excellent shape.

“What I found with this company is that they take such great pride in their product,” said Young. “They want that to show, and you can see that here already. And it will remain looking beautiful.”

[box type=”shadow” align=”” class=”” width=””]Boulevard at Brick: For More Information

 


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  • Rich W

    I’ll have the “keyless entree” with a side of fries.

  • Metro96

    looks really nice. great addition to the area

  • J W

    2 grand a month in rent. That’s twice my mortgage payment.

  • KaayC

    Drove past there and they look so nice compared to some of Bricks developments with mold encrusted leaf-ridden 1970s bungalows. Crazy that you need to clear a thou a week to live in that small square footage! Nice, but small. No tub is the dealbreaker lol. The twentieth century modern decor is getting so played.

    • Hillary got schlonged

      Youre one of those leaf haters.
      Jersey City and Newark would be a nice place for you to live.
      Why do people from the cities consider leaves trash or litter?
      As soon as Brooklynites or other city dwellers move here, they cut down the trees on their property.
      If you dont like leaves and trees, go back to Brooklyn.

      • KaayC

        I like the leaves and trees just fine. It is the slovenly who don’t rake that I object to. Too many pines don’t maintain their homes.

      • Hillary got schlonged

        Many of the residents of Brick are either elderly, poor or disabled.
        Many are all of the above combined. They are not “slovenly”.
        I know quite a few elderly people that have lived in those bungalows since the 40s and 50s and 60s when Brick was a paradise and there were only leaves on the ground, not empty beer cans and fast food wrappers and hypodermic needles from the urban city dwellers.
        Maple Leaf and Briarmills were farms and Evergreen Woods and Waterside Gardens were forests.
        You can keep your hot, blacktopped condos and apartment complexes.
        I will take a bungalow on a rural wooded lot everytime. Leaves, mold and cool summer shade included.

      • KaayC

        Not so fast, I observe more young and ablebodied too lazy or too good to pick up. By contrast we have a neighbor well into her eighties that rakes. She may only do one bag a day, but she does it and eventually the job gets done. We also pitch in to help when somebody becomes unable with a bad back for example. I was raised if you own a home – you maintain it, p.e.r.i.o.d. It may mean giving up your beer money to hire someone, but you get the job done. If you are unwilling or unable then you belong in an apartment or a senior community with gardening crews, not in a blighted home bringing others’ property down. Too much of that goes on here and it IS slovenly. All but the most severely disabled are capable of lifting a phone to call public works (who do a commendable job) to have a sofa picked up in lieu of leaving at the curb for months. The hypodermic needles are right here in river city’s own.

      • Hillary got schlonged

        Some people like leaves on the ground. Its the natural eco cycle of the seasons. Pine needles and leaves are a natural environmentally occurring mulch and fertilizer.
        Many prefer the chemical free, pesticide free way of gardening and lawn care.
        Leaves fall and then in spring and summer mulch with lawn mower and let native grasses and plants grow.
        Keep your toxic Chem lawns and Lawn Doctors chemicals and pesticides.

      • KaayC

        I hear ya and agree about the toxic stew of Chem Lawn and Lawn Dr. I personally favor no lawns and wildflowers! That being said, it is just not healthful to leave the leaves lying about til spring. That may have been appropriate when people had multiple acres, but on 95 by 100 lots as so many are in this county it is total insanity. We are not in Montana, we are in a burb of Joisey. Read up on mold toxicity if you don’t want to take my word. It is absolutely rampant in this county. Especially vulnerable are the young and elderly. Mold even causes cancer!

  • Stu Pidity

    Another future Maple Leaf Village built in Brick by the Lakewood/Brooklyn cult.