Home Shore Environment Here’s How Brick’s Sea Wall Looks After This Week’s Storm

Here’s How Brick’s Sea Wall Looks After This Week’s Storm

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Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

This week’s powerful nor’easter produced waves that scoured the township’s sea wall, creating drops of varying heights the length of town.

Mayor John Ducey said the wall was exposed from the area of Brick Beach III southward. Brick Beach I has a drop, however the wall cannot be seen. The worst-affected area of the township is Normandy Beach, where some areas have a drop of about15-feet, the mayor said.

More images can be found below.

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“It’s unsafe for anyone to go to those beaches,” said Ducey.

Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

Snow fencing is blocking most beach entrances. The wall, which is 39-feet high at its peak, is designed as a last-ditch measure if the dune system were to fail in a storm. Since no beach replenishment has been completed in Brick, the wall has acted as a first-line measure to prevent breaches in the barrier island. Once a planned beach replenishment project is completed, the wall will be located under a vegetated dune and officials are hopeful the scouring will no longer continue. Ducey said meetings are planned in the next several weeks to determine which towns will receive replenishment first in a $90 million federal dune-building project that was recently approved.

Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick's sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor'easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Brick’s sea wall exposed after the Jan. 23, 2017 nor’easter. Photo Jan. 25, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

“Hopefully the state will see what’s going on at our beaches,” Ducey said.


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  • MP Gerrity

    Any photos of Mantoloking Shores and Bay Head? Am curious to know how effective their rock wall has held up after the recent nor’easter. Thank-you

    • BlueBomberTurbo

      Bay Head yesterday morning at the Osborne Ave entrance looking south:

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5617b105d5b48dba63a8a5de02a03c2ccea50758f22c927b03511c69ed53516c.jpg

      • MP Gerrity

        Thank-you

      • J Andrew Lark

        WOW! Those sharp rocks look treacherous. I guess that swimming and (YIKES!) body-surfing at high tide will not be a wise undertaking in Bay Head for quite some time … OUCH!

        (That’s IF anyone can even GET into the water around there….)

        Hindsight is “20-20”, but the Sea Wall (with a sand berm) alternative sure looks like it would have been a MUCH wiser move…. :/

  • Goodgrief

    That worked well.

  • MP Gerrity

    There are +’s & -‘s to both. Neither are economically wise but great if you are in the beach replenishment business.

    The issue is absorption of wave energy. A vertical sheet pile wall creates a continuous membrane. When wave action impacts the wall, the impact energy resonates across the barrier island horizontally. It is very likely that homes built on raised piles will shake.

    Gravity and rising sea levels will eventually claim the rocks like clams on the rock wall in the northern end of the barrier island. Similar to Swamp Castle of Monty Python fame. And just like the owner of Swamp Castle, when that one sinks, another will be built in top, then another, then, well you get the picture.

  • Make America Greater

    What happens when a storm causes water to come over seawall then the water will be prevented from receding back into ocean because of the wall.

  • Make America Greater

    If this storm happened at full moon high tide, it would have been Sandy all over again.

    • KaayC

      I hate to concede the veracity of that. I hope I never see the likes of anything like that wicked witch Sandra again! Brings fear to my heart and makes my blood run cold. And I was very fortunate not being on the waterfront. Trees all down like tiddly winks though.

  • KaayC

    We are really battling an unstoppable force. That home in the next to last photo looks about perched to slide into the drink. It seems we need a wall, but about a mile inland. To state the obvious, we didn’t need that storm.

  • WeAllHaveMuch2Learn

    Water always wins.