Home School News Brick’s Birth Rate Declines, School Population Falls: What’s Next?

Brick’s Birth Rate Declines, School Population Falls: What’s Next?

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School Bus (File Photo/ Bill McChesney/Flickr)
School Bus (File Photo/ Bill McChesney/Flickr)

A demographic study commissioned by the Brick Township school district showed the township’s birth rate declined by nearly a quarter in a matter of 12 years, resulting in a declining school population.

The study, authored by Dr. Richard S. Grip and obtained by Shorebeat through a request under the Open Public Records Act, shows the Brick’s birth rate declined 21.4 percent between 2001 and 2012, with more seniors graduating high school than kindergarteners entering the system, ultimately leading to declines in school population. In the 2015-16 school year, for example, 188 more students graduated high school than entered kindergarten.

Brick’s birth rate was one of the lowest in Ocean County and lower than the state average, the study said. Between the 2006-07 school year and the start of the 2015-16 school year, the student population declined by 1,967 students, an 18 percent drop. Over the same time period, the district’s youngest students, those in preschool to fifth grade, dropped by 722. During the current school year, the district will educate 8,746 students, down from 10,714 in 2006-07.

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Brick’s birth rates were analogous to many of New Jersey’s suburbs outside of commuting distance to New York or Philadelphia, plagued by highest-in-the-nation taxes with few opportunities to produce sufficient income. From 2000 to 2010, Brick lost more females in the 35 to 39 year-old age group, at the same time mothers were beginning to have children in their mid-to-late 30s instead of earlier in life, the study said.

As it pertains to school attendance, Grip’s study effective predicts a plateau. Eventually, the smaller elementary school populations will reach high school, and kindergarten replacement metrics will essentially even out. The study predicted school population between now and the 2020-21 school year. Another 521 students would be lost during that period, after which the population will begin to stabilize.

“In the final year of the projection period, positive kindergarten replacement of six students is projection,” Grip wrote.

The 46-page study also looked at school-by-school population, finding that Brick Township Memorial High School would suffer the largest drop – 234 students – while Emma Havens Young Elementary School and Lake Riviera Middle School would follow with drops of 143 and 130 students, respectively.

Ultimately, by the end of the study period – the 2020-21 school year, – the district will have a smaller population than the current school year. The total number of students is forecast to be 8,225 that year.

District officials have rarely commented on the study, besides acknowledging its existence. Board President John Lamela told Shorebeat after a recent Board of Education meeting that the district would form a Demographic Committee. To date, however, that committee has not met.

 

“We’re looking at it based on school population,” he said, adding board members had not yet been brief on the report by Interim Superintendent Thomas Gialanella.

Read the Report:


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  • Big Cheese

    So where’s the tax reductions? Home values go down, property taxes go up, school population goes down, property taxes go up. All without a proper explanation.

    • KaayC

      Explanation is the politicos steal w. two hands.

      • Spencer Trilby

        KaayC is a moldy hippy who likes to bugger little minority children…that’s how white liberals help the coloreds on the plantation

      • sue di nimmiano

        Take your meds!

    • Smokin

      But now a election year and there’s a surplus and taxes could decrease humm how convenient

      • Big Cheese

        1/2 a cent is not going to get you re-elected when you lost 1500 enrolled kids during your term. The savings on that alone needs to be looked at. They claim 2/3 of your tax bill is for schools so whatever they are spending per kid x 1500 is a considerable savings. Where is the surplus?

      • coolerhead

        The 1/2 cent is the municipal budget. The school budget is controlled by the School Board. The Township has no control over that dollar amount. The tax bill includes municipal, school, fire district, county, library taxes, all collected by the Township, but the Township only controls the municipal rate. If you want lower school taxes go to a School Board meeting. I think my Federal income taxes are also to high but I do not complain to the Mayor.

  • Surfrider

    I, for one, do not think it is entirely a “reduction in births” in this town. People are moving out because of the high taxes, they can no longer afford. When your home value goes down and taxes go up, not a very good situation for the town. Good paying local jobs are almost non existent. And the town keeps putting up taxes and hiring more police….. the town is in the process of pricing its own existence out. Ducey lowered the ratable by 1/2% (a political reelection move), a step in right direction, but does not in any way address in a meaningful way the top issue in this town of making it more affordable here. Taxable ratables in this town are diminishing, just look at all the “for rent” signs in all these “mini malls”. Still the biggest issues are health benefits and the structure of the pension system, and corruption, all of which are leading most towns to unaffordability…

  • Make America Greater

    Lakewood people buying properties all over Brick twp.
    My friend sold a house to some.
    I will sell mine to some one day.
    One day Brick will have more school age children than they could have dreamed of, but they will all be in private schools.

  • Smokin

    Could it be because more families are moving out of brick for less drugs problems and safer, lower taxes , better schools and less political BS ok BS is everywhere

    • KaayC

      Could be. N let us not forget the demography of housing just aged and fugly. Mold, leaves and trash abounding in such force. Where is code enforcement? Freakin’ pineys.

      • Make America Greater

        Go back to Brooklyn!

      • KaayC

        Are you special or just slow? Again, I am not from Brooklyn and before you again go slamming Brooklyn, I once again assure you….you probably could not afford to live there. I have my foot already planted in another state for when work responsibilities are a wrap. I wont let the door hit me in the asset. Goodbye fugly. If you love it so well why are you selling to Lakewood people?

      • Spencer Trilby

        Your obviously a jew

      • sue di nimmiano

        “Your” instead of “you’re” = Bricktucky grammar. What school did you go to?

    • Make America Greater

      More families are moving out of town because they don’t want to raise children anywhere near KaayC.

  • J W

    Kids are expensive. Nobody can afford them, especially in a town where minimum wage retail jobs dominate.

    • Spencer Trilby

      Kids are expensive. But your people seem to have plenty of them. Most don’t even have a job!

      • KaayC

        “Your people” ? My, my.

      • Spencer Trilby

        Yes you liberal hippy piece of crap. Just go ahead and die you baby boomer pos.

      • sue di nimmiano

        Take your meds now!

      • Make America Greater

        Many people use birth control or have abortions so they don’t have a child that grows up to be like KaayC.

      • KaayC

        And then there are those of us in favor of making abortion retroactive for imbeciles like yourself.

  • KaayC

    Exactly. Much of the country is like that. Housing and taxes are a bajillion dollars. Where they arent – there are no real wage jobs. Tear down the McMansions and one percent housing and birthrates will increase. Frankly I gave been in favor of zero percent population growth for decades, for ecological reasons, but it is sad if it falls all to one generation. Young people don’t have it easy.

    • Spencer Trilby

      Bajillion…great grammar

  • BB

    School taxes are now out of control for our educational system here in Brick and really Ocean County and the entire US for that matter. You all most know by now that close to 70%, yes 70%, of your Brick property tax bill is allocated to the schools, this is where the work needs to be accomplished in order for any significant reductions in our tax bills.

    I’m all for education but at the rate of increases we have seen over the years, which in my opinion where way out of control, we’re going to have to allocate most of our pay checks just to pay these taxes. It’s getting harder and harder for Brick residents to afford to live here because of these school taxes. Now, according to this Shorebeat article, it’s a fact that the enrollement of our schools are down and at this point minus 1,967 students x’s $14,000 per student( per each school year) that already equals a $27,538,000.00 savings to tax payers without even thinking. (SHOW US (each homeowner)THE MONEY) It is time to really move into this direction of lowering school taxes around the entire US, perhaps starting with consolidation of services. How do we continue to keep going on like this?????
    PASS THE WORD BRICK…….START TALKING BRICK……..GET INVOLVED……LOWER SCHOOL TAXES……………..