Home Brick Life County to Replace, Widen Midstreams Bridge in Brick

County to Replace, Widen Midstreams Bridge in Brick

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A vehicle traverses the Midstreams Bridge in Brick. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
A vehicle traverses the Midstreams Bridge in Brick. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

The Midstreams Bridge, which carries traffic on Jordan-Midstreams Road across Beaver Dam Creek, is set to be completely replaced as part of a $3.9 million county project.

The current bridge, built in 1962, is a 131-foot long, 35-foot wide structure consisting of adjacent precast concrete slab beams supported on concrete pile caps founded on timber piles with timber bulkheading.

According to county engineering officials, the existing timber piles and timber bulkhead substructure show signs of “advanced deterioration” while the existing concrete pile caps exhibit delamination and moderate section loss.

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“Additionally, the bridge deck width is substandard given the increased traffic volumes,” the county said in a statement.

The new bridge will be a 111 foot-long single span structure consisting of adjacent precast and prestressed concrete box beams, supported on full height reinforced concrete abutments, founded on cast-in-place steel pipe piles and concrete footings.

The width of the new structure shall be 49 feet and include a 40-foot curb-to-curb cartway along with a 6-foot wide sidewalk on the west side. The proposed bridge rail will be a 4-bar galvanized steel with cast-in-place concrete pylons. Included in the scope is the extensive installation of steel sheet bulkheading, revised roadway profile and upgraded guide rail.

A vehicle traverses the Midstreams Bridge in Brick. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
A vehicle traverses the Midstreams Bridge in Brick. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
A vehicle traverses the Midstreams Bridge in Brick. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
A vehicle traverses the Midstreams Bridge in Brick. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

Extensive utility relocations are required for this project including aerial electric, telephone and cable as well as an underground gas line.

Freeholder Jack Kelly said permits for the project are in place and the county recently passed a $3.9 million bond ordinance to fund the construction work.

“Everything is ready to go, from the design to the permits,” said Kelly, who serves as liaison to the Ocean County Engineering Department. “With the funding in place we can now go out for bids on the project.”

Work is expected to begin on the span in fall. Construction will be staged, allowing operation of a single lane for northbound traffic at all times. Construction is expected to take about 12 months.